Tag Archives: workshop

Hertfordshire Superbikes Launches on-line TV channel on YouTube

Hi ladies and gents!

As per the title, we have launched Herts Superbikes TV, as part of our YouTube channel.

Basically, it is a series of videos, to show our customers and the public the day-to-day happenings at a busy motorcycle workshop.

You get to see behind-the-scenes action, as well as the laughs and banter that goes on! You’ll also pick up tips and advice along the way!

We haven’t got professional video equipment, not are we professional videographers (give us a Ducati and we can work wonders, however!).

Check out the channel below!

http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLbVD-7wRPZRJ3407gSMtEDWqFHrxzAhdL

Thanks,

Ali

 

Changing motorcycle oil – simple and effective

This is a quick post – part of a series of instructional posts that I will be writing.

Changing your motorcycle oil is a simple and straightforward job, depending on the bike, age, mileage, condition etc. The oil acts as a lubricant for the engine and all its internal gubbins.

Firstly, ensure that your motorcycle is secure and raised on a centre-stand or auxiliary stand. For the demo bike we used, we opted for an auxiliary stand (it’s more secure, and this bike does not have a centre-stand).

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Our demo bike has a sump-guard, which we need to remove. Remove the sump guard, bellypan or fairing if the bike has one.

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Next, you need to locate the drain bolt. It’s usually on the bottom part of the sump, and with a clean container (needs to be clean so you can see if the oil has been contaminated with any debris – or even metal shavings – we’ve seen it all before!) placed, unscrew it.

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Also, using the correct tools, remove the oil filter.

Grab a can, or a coffee, and relax for a while (half an hour is usually more than enough for it all to drain out).

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Post-coffee, replace the filter with a new filter, using the same tools (only tighten to 10nm, or just past hand-tight), and lubricating the rubber seal with engine oil. Replace the sump drain bolt – new sealing copper washer – tightened to correct settings. Fill up oil with the correct amount, and check the quantity. Usually, it’s a dipstick to check the level, or a sight glass – all bikes are different, so do check your book for the correct procedure.

The type and quantity of oil is in your handbook or owners manual.

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Start the bike up, check for leaks, and if all good, reward yourself for a quick quid saved!

Please note: we accept no liability whatsoever of the accuracy of the above info. The above guide is a reference only. Your motorcycle may be different, and require a different procedure. Please always consult your owners manual and technician for any advice. Alternatively, give us a call!!